Three Ethical Retailers For Your Next Sustainable Fashion Purchase

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brand

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brands such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

s such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

[“source=forbes]

Fashion for a cause

Image result for Fashion for a cause

Maija Onzule models at the Fashion for a Cure event in Queenstown on Thursday night.

The fourth annual Queenstown Fashion for a Cure event was held at The Grille.

Hundreds of people packed in to the venue see the fashions.

The event supports Breast Cancer Cure, a charity that fundraises for research to find a cure for breast cancer.

Fashion for a Cure started in Auckland and has spread around the country.

Breast Cancer Cure general manager Phillipa Green said last year’s show in Queenstown raised a record $90,000.

This year’s event, hosted by Shane Cortese, featured fashion from top designers Trelise Cooper, Storm, RUBY, Zambesi and Kathryn Wilson Footwear.

[“source=forbes]

Fashion: Put off by skimpy swimwear? Here are some fabulous alternatives

M&Co Plain Black Tummy Control Stripe Swimsuit, £30

AS WE creep ever closer to holiday season (yay!), you may have noticed – in the shops or on social media – that swimwear seems to be shrinking.

Swimsuits come with deep V-fronts and ludicrously high-cut legs, while bikinis are becoming even itsy-bitsier and teeny-weenier than ever.

That’s all well and good if you’re a tanned and toned celeb or a leggy model but what if you don’t want to flash your bum or side-boob or tan lines when you head off on hols?

The good news is, among this year’s swim collections, there are actually a lot of amazing options for those of us who need more a few inches of Lycra and strings or straps to keep our bits in place.

You can find a lot of great options online, and save money on your purchase with the use of a Shein discount code.

From sleek swimsuits to flattering bikinis, these stylish pieces will make you look and feel amazing this summer.

BLACK BATHING SUITS

We all know black clothes are super-slimming, and the same applies to swimwear, especially if you opt for a swimsuit that comes in a suck-it-all-in fabric. Black mesh is also great for giving the illusion of a bikini but with more support.

:: M&Co Plain Black Tummy Control Stripe Swimsuit, £30

:: Bluebella Aegean Swimsuit, £32

:: Fat Face Phantom Textured Swimsuit, £38

HIGH-WAIST BIKINIS

There’s a reason high-waisted bikinis are so popular with plus-size fashion bloggers – they’re fantastic for emphasising your waist and skimming over that lower midriff area that so many of us are keen to keep under wraps. Floral patterns and cute ruffle details make these two-pieces even prettier.

:: Simply Yours Halterneck Bikini Top, £26, and matching Strappy Bikini Brief, £16, Simply Be

:: Boux Avenue Adelaide Sling Bikini Top, £30, and matching High-waisted Bikini Briefs, £18

:: Junarose Ruffle Detail Halterneck Bikini Top, £28, and matching Bikini Bottoms, £24, Navabi

SUPPORTIVE BIKINIS

Blessed in the breast department? You’re probably going to want to steer clear of soft-cup triangle bikinis. Instead, look for bra-like tops with padded cups, underwiring and thick straps for ultimate support (and sexiness).

:: (Left) Curvy Kate Blue Stripe ‘Ahoy’ Halterneck Bikini Top £36, and matching Fold Over Bikini Briefs, £20; (Right) Curvy Kate Blue Stripe ‘Ahoy’ Balcony Bikini Top, £36, and matching Tie Side Bikini Briefs, £20, Swimwear365

:: Figleaves Riptide Underwired Twist Plunge Bikini Top, £28, and matching Riptide Twist Brief, £18

:: Lipsy Alice Bikini Top, £32, and matching Briefs, £20, Next

ONE-PIECE WONDERS

Combining candy colours and simple silhouettes, these bright swimsuits will help you channel modern pin-up glamour. Look for wrap and drape detailing that skims and slims.

:: Simply Yours Plait Bandeau Swimsuit, £35, JD Williams

:: Seaspray Lagoon Ombre Draped Strapsuit, £78

:: Matalan Stripe Tie Front Swimsuit, £16

[“Source-irishnews”]

Fashion comes from within, says Japan’s style guru Naoko Okusa

Image result for Fashion comes from within, says Japan's style guru Naoko Okusa

If you ask Naoko Okusa how to dress your best, she will tell you to look inside yourself before you stare into your overcrowded closet or oversized mirror.

Arguably the most influential fashion stylist in Japan, Okusa, who has 136,000 followers on Instagram, offers tried-and-true tips for women who are stuck in a style rut.

She helps them discover — or rediscover — the joy of dressing up by helping them experiment different stylistic affiliations while staying true to their essence.

“The way you dress and the way you live are two sides of the same coin. They can’t be disconnected,” Okusa, 45, says.

“It’s not the amount of clothes you own. It’s how well you know yourself that allows you to wear what makes you feel and look like the best version of yourself,” she says.

Okusa says if you’re relying on designer tags to make your style and people see the Hermes Birkin bag holding you and not vice versa, it’s a sign that you have yet to learn the language of fashion.

“I wouldn’t want to be remembered as ‘the lady with the Birkin bag’ because that means Birkin makes a bigger impression than you. A woman who chooses to splurge on designer handbags and be someone she is not should know that her self-esteem is superficial.”

What seems like a dream job happened by chance. After transitioning from the fashion magazine editor’s desk to the life of a freelancer, Okusa was doing everything herself.

“I was an editor, producer, creative director, stylist,” she says. Although she never called herself one, “people started referring to me as a stylist so I figured that must be my thing.”

Okusa knows fashion. She pursues it, and she breathes it. Not only does she hand-select clothing and accessories worn by models at photo shoots, she has exclusive contracts with retailers as their fashion consultant and is a best-selling author and speaker.

She’s not one to tell you to camouflage your body flaws with draped sleeves or flared pants. Rather, she would remind you that a well-maintained physique is the foundation of dressing well and tell you to hit the gym.

“Fashion is about you, but dressing well equates to good manners. It’s about making others feel good too,” she says.

“You can’t deny that it’s also a way to appeal to the other sex, whether you’re a man or a woman. Say you’re going out with a banker, an advertising agent, a tech company president, a freelance artist — wouldn’t your clothes depend on who your date is?”

Okusa says she used to alter the way she dresses to please her boyfriends, but when she met her Venezuelan partner and current husband after a failed first marriage she found a sense of security that soon reflected in her clothing choices.

“I like stronger women more than fragile women, cool over cute, self-reliant over dependent, basics over trendy. That’s me, and he has no problem with that. Now I know what I want, in fashion and in life.”


[Photo courtesy of Naoko Okusa]

There was an off-track phase post divorce, she says. At that time she needed to wear bright, vivid colors to make herself believe she was happy. She looks back on the few photos she has from those days and sees a lost girl trying hard to conceal her emotions.

Okusa says she has learned that “dressing your age” is not necessarily negative. She wants middle-aged women know that just because they are now choosing from a small selection of clothes doesn’t mean they are less attractive.

On the contrary, Okusa says, it means less stress, less distraction, less expense, and more peace.

“Age helped me declutter my wardrobe. Age helped me get rid of the things I don’t need. It made my fashion options narrower and deeper,” she says.

“Yes, you get that extra layer of fat and you start noticing gray hair. In my case, my dull complexion taught me to avoid pastel colors and light beige. But hey, a colorful closet doesn’t equal a colorful life.”


[Photo courtesy of Naoko Okusa] 

Okusa notices women in Japan are experiencing a general fashion confusion, and they think their best bet is to emulate the style of the Parisians and the New Yorkers. One of the most popular questions she gets from fans is “What do I look good in?”

But that’s a question that requires one-on-one counseling, Okusa says. She says she would need to know your background, your budget, your closet content, how you want to feel and who you want to be.

She suggests finding a brutally honest friend or a critical family member whom you can turn to for fashion advice, but better yet, she says you can always train yourself to stand back and look at yourself objectively. It takes practice to dress well, and it’s a lifelong learning curve.

One thing the fashionista strongly recommends is getting others to take photos of you. “Not the ‘say cheese’ kind of photos, but ones that capture unexpected moments,” she says. Knowing your facial features and posture is a start.

“I want people to learn to make objective decisions through fashion. It takes discipline. I’m 45 now, but I can say I’m much more fashionable than I was when I was 30. And in 15 years’ time I know I’ll be even more so because I’ll be better trained.”

Okusa has always dared to be different and original, and can’t think of a fashion icon she idolized growing up.

If not from people, where does she get her fashion inspiration?

“There’s not a fashion blogger or Instagrammer I follow. Fashion is such a big part of my life already, I feel like I get enough. So I look elsewhere,” she says.

“If I see delicate pink sweets placed on a dark gray slate plate, it teaches me that soft and hard go well together, and mixing light color to dark can add freshness that gives the combination some kick.”

If she had to name one person that influenced her fashion choices, Okusa says it would have to be her mother. She never wore anything expensive but never seemed to have a style dilemma either.

“As a little girl I used to love her color and fabric choices. She also had a sense for home decor. It was chic, and her fashion blended with the interiors. I don’t really remember her wearing flashy colors. It was more brown, beige and navy.”

Okusa says she chooses not to drop serious cash on high-end designer clothes for her three children, but she and her husband do their best to teach them fashion etiquette.

“I want to spend money on myself so I’m not buying expensive clothes for my kids. But fashion can be a communication tool if you shop together or talk about what to wear on what occasion,” says Okusa, who has two daughters and one son.

“They’re free to wear what they want at home, but I tell them it’s not okay when it involves other people. For instance, when my son insisted he wear his soccer jersey to a fine-dining restaurant, I had to explain to him clothes can show respect or disrespect.”

With her latest book — her 13th — published in April, Okusa says she is enjoying a career landed by accident but led by passion, and the longer she works, the more she realizes she is doing a lot more than helping women create the perfect wardrobe.

“The great thing about my job is that I get to relive a person’s life story. I get to learn about their past and get a glimpse of their future. Sometimes I feel more like a therapist than a fashion advisor,” Okusa says.

“I want to free women from deceptive marketing messages that make them feel worthless without a Birkin bag. No one should be measured by the number of brand items they own. Clothes don’t make the woman. The woman makes the clothes.”

[“Source-KyodoNewsPlus”]

Frivolous fashions! The most memorable fashion looks from Royal Ascot

Image result for Frivolous,fashions!,The,most,memorable,fashion,looks,from,Royal,Ascot

The Royal Ascot may be the most prestigious English horse race, but it’s also one of the biggest fashion events of Britain’s high-society calendar. Royals and socialites flock to the Berkshire green for five days of equestrian action and more importantly the fanciest fashions.

Ever since it’s inception in around 1711, the Royal Ascot has set the scene for exquisite sartorial style, but it must be noted, one can’t just turn up in any old thing, there’s a strict Royal Ascot dress code.

Women must wear dresses of an appropriate length, meaning just above or below the knee, dress straps must be a least 2.5cm thick (no spaghetti straps!), hats are serious business, no facinators, however a headpiece which has a solid base of 10cm or more in diameter is acceptable.

Meanwhile, for the gents, socks are a must, as are black shoes, a waistcoat must be paired with a tie (no cravats) and a black or grey top hat is to be worn.

Now you’re clued up on the fashion dos and don’ts, let’s take a look back at some of the most memorable fashion moments in the history of the Royal Ascot horse races.

[“Source-nowtolove”]

This Viral Tweet Explains Why Pockets Are the Unicorns Of Women’s Fashion

If you’ve ever reached down to put something in your pocket only to realize that whatever you’re wearing doesn’t actually have pockets, then consider yourself in the majority. It’s a frustrating situation to be in, especially if you’ve only got a few things to carry and don’t feel like lugging around a bag or purse.

Twitter user Delilah Dawson recently shared some thoughts about this dilemma, proving that the struggle is so real when it comes to the lack of pockets in women’s clothing. In her tweet, she wrote a fake exchange between “women” and an “exec” where the women are trying to ask for pockets and the “exec” keeps suggesting other funny additions to clothing like “Clothes with pre-made holes in delicate fabrics” and “Shapes that require new bras!”

Responses to the tweet were hilarious and completely relatable, with people saying that dresseswith pockets are basically the unicorns of fashion.

One person said that she learned to sew just so that she could take care of this problem herself. Now that’s some serious dedication right there.
Others pointed out that even the clothes that do come with pockets can be, well, problematic. Inquiring minds want to know: What’s up with jeans that are so tight that you can’t actually put anything into the pockets? I mean, why even bother?

While a viral tweet probably won’t be enough to sway an entire industry to reconsider its stance on pockets in womenswear, it can at least bring us all together in a brief moment of fashion solidarity. And maybe, just maybe, one day we’ll get the clothing-with-pockets that we all want and deserve.

[“Source-teenvogue”]

BRING CHANGE WITH FASHION

Bring change with fashion

The fashion industry is not just about the style quotient. It has taken a big leap with new technological expansions, opening up various doors for the designers to innovate. The budding designers are taught new softwares to aid their ideas, use eco-friendly fabrics and incorporating milk and even pineapple.

Fashion is more than what the big brands make it. If we combine the immense amounts of creativity and technology available today, sky is the limit. The JD Institute of Fashion Technology (JDIFT)’s fashion awards themed  ‘Change’ is a great example of that. Students were encouraged to think about the future, not only in terms of sustainability but in terms of inclusiveness as well. Right from the making of the fabric, to the selling of the garment, the designers are now looking to do things and bring about change.

“The theme was on how sustainability works. It is an attempt to make more responsible designers and think about more than just the fabric and the stitch,” Akshara Dala, director academics, JD Institute of Fashion Technology, says.

From a corporate line for the visually challenged that has QR code tags to read the description out loud to special athleisure wear in support of the LGBT community and a new collection for people with Down Syndrome, the students took up  various issues into consideration that they see around  and come up with a solution with their clothing line.

The collection ensures that it is comfortable with special care taken while choosing a fabric. The theme was also a great way to educate people and help them open up to ideas that they are otherwise unaware of.

Rudrani Chettri, India’s first a transgender who founded India’s first LGBT modelling agency, says: “People are a little intimidated but they know fashion is all about experimenting. The idea of a transgender is rather ugly to the people but with the help of fashion, this misconception can change. Fashion is now in the hands of the youth and they’re taking this opportunity to do more for the community than just setting trends. Fashion is about what you want to be and with the right kind of grooming and education, this is now a very realistic possibility.

[“Source-dailypioneer”]