Sotheby’s Bourbon Parma Family Jewels Auction Yields $53.1 Million Thanks to Marie-Antoinette Jewels

Earlier this year, I broke the news here about the Royal Jewels from the Bourbon Parma Family going up for sale at Sotheby’s. The White Glove Sale took place on Wednesday with 100 percent of the 100 lots, including pieces owned by Marie-Antoinette, selling. Additionally, one piece, a special pearl owned by Queen Marie-Antoinette, broke the world record for a natural pearl sold at auction – going for $36.2 million.

Queen Marie Antoinette’s Pearl was the big-ticekt item at the Royal Jewels from the Bourbon Parma Family auction by Sotheby’s November 2018Sotheby’s

The biggest-ticket item, the 18th century natural pearl pendant that sold for $36.2 million, was originally estimated to sell for about $1 to $2 million. In fact, the entire auction was initially expected to draw about $7 million in sales, but set a world record, for being the largest royal jewelry sale ever. Heretofore, the record was $50.3 million garnered at the Duchess of Windsor auction nearly three decades ago in 1987. Of the final total auction sales of $53.1 million, 10 pieces owned by the famous queen comprised the majority, at $42.7 million. The second largest sale was that of an important three-strand pearl and diamond necklace owned by the queen, which sold for $2.278 million.

It is said that before she was taken captive and later beheaded, Marie Antoinette had wrapped her jewelry – pearls, diamonds and rubies – in cotton and sent them along with some clothes in a trunk to Brussels. They then traveled to Vienna where the Austrian emperor was Marie-Antoinette’s nephew. He returned them to the queen’s daughter Madame Royale in 1795 and then passed in into the Bourbon Parma family, which put these pieces up for auction at Sotheby’s.

A model shows a stunning diamond pendant, supporting a natural pearl of exceptional size (26 mm x 18 mm) that belonged to Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and will be auctioned in the ÒRoyal Jewels from the Bourbon-Parma FamilyÓ sale at SothebyÕs Geneva on 12 November 2018 (estimate: $1-2 million), at Sotheby’s on June 12, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by Michael Bowles/Getty Images for Sotheby’s)Sotheby’s

Other pieces up for sale in the auction included  jewels owned by later generations of the Bourbon Parma family. Fetching nearly $1 million was a diamond ara taht had belonged to Maria Anna of Austria in the early 20th century and was made by the Austrian jeweller Hübner.  Most of hte bidding during the auction — with bidders from 43 countriies  participating came in the form of online bids, with 25 percent being newcomers to Sotheby’s.

“Tonight we saw the Marie Antoinette factor work its magic. No other queen is more famous for her love of jewels, and her personal treasures, pearls and diamonds that survived intact the tumults of history, captivated the interest of collectors around the world,” says Daniela Mascetti, Sotheby’s Jewelry Chairman in Europe.

[“source=forbes]

Jewellery exhibition off to a glittering start

A model showing a necklace at a jewellery exhibition in Vijayawada on Friday.

A three-day B2B exhibition Grand Abhushanam, organised by the All India Gem and Jewellery Domestic Council (AIGJDC), was inaugurated at SS Convention Centre here on Friday by Municipal Administration Minister P. Narayana.

Addressing the gathering, Mr. Narayana said about four lakh people were dependent on making jewellery for their livelihood, and the government was committed to extending support to them and entrepreneurs looking to invest in the sector.

The government was giving incentives to attract investments, which jewellery makers should utilise, he said.

AIGJDC vice-chairman Anantha Padmanaban said road shows were conducted across the southern region in the last few weeks and jewellers were excited to visit the exhibition.

AIGJDC director Ashok Kumar Jain said the exhibition was intended not only to boost the trade in small towns and cities, but connect manufacturers from small towns with local trade bodies. Exhibition co-convener Rajesh Rokde, A.P. Bullion Gold, Silver and Diamond Merchants’ Association president K. Vijaya Kumar and chief organiser Shantilal Jain were present.

[“source=ndtv”]

Three Ethical Retailers For Your Next Sustainable Fashion Purchase

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brand

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brands such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

s such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

[“source=forbes]

Louis Vuitton

Was there any designer who powered female confidence more than Phoebe Philo did while she was at Céline? Looking back to her first runway season with this house, Spring 2010, I wrote that she designs “fashion as it’s really lived.” I stand by that. Always just an edge ahead—say, by a white pointed shoe (first seen, Fall 2012)—of what we thought we’d never, ever wear, and are now totally into, Philo widened the parameters of that which is silently, joyfully accepted by women. It turned into that rare thing: the consensus-dressing of a generation. The extent of the copying of Philo’s Céline in contemporary fashion made her style seem, like the weather, so normal, so taken for granted as to be almost invisible.

Sisters should know that the clothes and accessories in this Pre-Fall lookbook, shot by Philo’s friend Juergen Teller, are definitively her last work of this era. The weirdness in the fashion system being what it is, the collection will be delivered now-ish, through June, while the previously reviewed Fall collection, by a team, will follow, before Hedi Slimane’s Céline debut is shown in October.

As her exit statement, it’s worth pausing a bit over the imagery. In the absence of her wanting to say very much, people always read signs of Philo’s emotional states and feminism into her clothes. Well, what’s here? The bold stares of the women into Teller’s lens read as an ultimate statement of how far the projection of self-worth has come today—an autonomous, makeup-free, totally don’t-care-who’s-judging-me attitude. Rude women. It’s a powerful, courageous aspiration for the female condition as we go about our lives in the era of Time’s Up, you might contend. (And as a footnote: Karolin Wolter, the model with the blonde pixie cut, has exactly the same hairstyle that Philo has been wearing lately. It might be going too far to see her as a self-portrait. But . . . )

Clothes-wise, on these defiant females, you see all the extravagant chicness and the humor, the wearability and the downright ugly weirdness that have given Céline addicts their fixes all these years. There’s an emphasis on super-deluxe leather, patchworked into graphic stripes and diagonals, or kinkily, and very Frenchly, cut in black. But what are those hefty black safety boots that look as if they could wade in the mud of a construction site? Hilarious! (Still, so many Céline clients are successful architects.)

Calmingly, there are the trouser suits that have anchored it all along. There are three slim, bootleg-y versions—stone, burgundy, a black tuxedo—for all those people who will want to stockpile (while noting how a color-matched hoodie worn under a tailored jacket makes a new three-piece suit, thank you very much). Challengingly, there are those super-extra pleated pants too. Not something you might want to jump into straightaway, perhaps. But assuredly, some will, and with Philo’s track record of setting an extreme that becomes normal through copying in a few seasons flat? You might as well buy and lay them down like a fine wine, until the moment they mature. (From experience, you know this makes sense.)

There will be much of this sort to plunder for future-wearing. As she left, Philo made a vintage collection of trophies and souvenirs. It puts the seal on her reputation as the woman who oriented other grown-up women through the best part of the last decade. Let the shopping frenzy begin.

[“source=vogue”]

Politics is a dangerous game: Rajinikanth

Photographs by Bandeep Singh

Will he, won’t he? Southern superstar Rajinikanth has exhibited Hamletian indecision about pursuing a political career ever since he announced he was joining the fray in December 2017. So far, he has not even announced the name of his political party, choosing instead to deploy his massive fan following under the umbrella of his Rajini Makkal Mandrams and using them to build a cadre of party workers across Tamil Nadu. Meanwhile, the ageing star (he is 67) continues to do what he knows best-make iconic films. His latest-2.0, releasing November 29-has a monster Rs 540 crore budget, possibly the costliest Indian film ever made. A sci-fi thriller, it is a sequel to the blockbuster Enthiran (Robot), where Rajini played a double role, one as a robot replica of himself. His political fortunes now ride on the success of 2.0. If it proves to be another superhit, it will put his entry into Tamil Nadu’s political arena on the fast track. The star has always been cagey about his political plans. But in an in-depth interview at his home in Poes Garden (close to former chief minister J. Jayalalithaa’s), Rajinikanth spoke candidly to India Today not only about his life and films but also his political vision for Tamil Nadu, and a range of burning public issues. Excerpts:

Q. Despite your age, you continue to exude tremendous energy and passion in your films. Where does it come from?

A. In the beginning, I took to acting for a livelihood. Thereafter, I met the needs of my life. Now, I am enjoying it. It is entertaining to me. It is not like a profession. If I treat it like a profession, then work becomes a burden. Now it is like a game, it is relaxing. That’s probably where I get my energy from, from that thought.

Q. What kind of movies do you enjoy doing the most these days?

A. Comedy. I am very comfortable doing comedy scenes. When I go to the set and they say they are doing comedy scenes today, I jump. It is very difficult to make someone laugh, it is a bigger task. Not the dialogue type of comedy. Situation comedy is more challenging.

Q. Your early life was a struggle, you even worked as a bus conductor. How did that mould your outlook on life?

A. I am grateful to god that I went through all that suffering, those difficulties, which is why I am enjoying this life. [Pointing to the surroundings of his house] Otherwise, I wouldn’t have tasted this. I have known suffering, so I am enjoying this so-called success.

Q. Tell us why and how you took to acting?

A. It is a long story but I will tell you in short-it began with a play I did in Bangalore. Every year, for its anniversary celebration, each depot of the Karnataka transport department [where he worked as a bus conductor] had to stage a play. I chose to play Duryodhana because I was an NTR fan. I was a good imitator and I imitated him on stage. Raj Bahadur [a fellow driver] told me you are fantastic, you are not fit to be here, go to the film institute in Chennai, one day you will become a big actor. He encouraged me, and my brother [Satyanarayana Rao] also supported me financially. I joined the film institute where I met [director] K. Balachander who chose me for a film of his. The rest, as they say, is history.

Q. Who was your role model in acting, especially the style you developed?

A. From the beginning, Sivaji Ganesan. I used to imitate Sivaji. Even in dialogue deliveries. But when I was working with Balachander, it changed. He told me why do you want to imitate Sivaji Ganesan when Sivaji Ganesan is already there? That completely changed me. He identified in me the speed, the fast way I did things or whatever it is I did while acting. He told me: Retain it, that is your originality, your style, this is your hallmark, your signature. And that is how my style came about.

Q. That famous cigarette flip, how did you pick that up?

A. Shatrughan Sinha first did it in a Hindi film. I took it from there and improvised on it. I had to practise it for over a thousand times to perfect it. It is a skill but, more than that, the timing is important. Just not throwing it up, but to deliver the dialogue, the kind of situation and then you flip it.

Q. Your swagger, did you pick that up too?

A. It is not style, it comes to me naturally. People say I am stylish, okay, right.

Q. What is the biggest lesson you have learnt after all these years in your long career?

A. Everything is drama (laughs out loud).

Q. How challenging was acting in 2.0 compared to your other films?

A. 2.0 is a technician’s movie. It is Shankar’s creation, it is completely his picture, he is all in one. Which means we don’t have to do any thinking, we just do what he says, that’s it. He takes full responsibility. In other films, I give my inputs, my thoughts, my imagination, I improvise. I also discuss things with Shankar. But it is 90 per cent his job and he does it well.

Q. 2.0 has climate change as its theme. Are you trying to convey a larger message?

A. It is science fiction. It is a thriller. It is a matter of pride for Indian cinema. It can easily be compared to any Hollywood movie, in its making, in its content and in everything else. It is really an excellent picture.

Q. How is it different from Enthiran?

A. 2.0 is an advanced Enthiran. It is on another level. Now we are dealing with universal issues, it has a larger message.

Q. Do you like to convey messages through your films?

A. Basically, I am an entertainer. A Rajinikanth film means that children, parents, the family come expecting some entertainment. So I have to cater to them. In that, if I get any space to convey a good message, I try to do it.

Q. The late MGR and Karunanidhi used their films to convey political messages. Have you tried to do that?

A. From the beginning, I decided not to mix the two. Entertainment is different and politics entirely different. We should not make use of the entertainment media for that. Of course, some dialogue here and there will happen. How people interpret it and how they take it, we cannot stop. But I won’t do that deliberately.

Q. If you were to assess MGR’s contribution in cinema as well as politics, what would it be?

A. One thing is enough. As a cinema hero-for the first time in the world-he proved that he was a good politician and ruled the state. He proved that an artist can rule a state. That in itself is a very big thing.

Q. Is he in some way a role model for you?

A. For anyone in cinema who wants to enter politics, he is a role model.

Q. What lessons did you learn from MGR?

A. Mainly, his giving, helping nature. He had empathy for the poor and weak…not only after becoming a politician, but even before when he was in the cinema industry. He was known for his humanity and that is what I liked the most about him.

Q. What are your views on Jayalalithaa; she too was in films and came into politics?

A. Whatever else you may say, she was a great lady. Her courage, her determination, I appreciated that.

Q. What about her governance?

A. Governance, I don’t want to talk about now. But her quality of how she ruled and lived, a single woman in a man’s world… that is historic.

Q. You had differences with her. In 1996, you made a statement against her that adversely affected her electoral fortunes. Did you make up with her after that?

A. Ya, ya. She attended my daughter’s marriage. We used to respect her a lot.

Q. Do you consider Kamal Haasan a rival now that both of you have decided to enter politics?

A. Rivals? Not at all. Says who? I won’t even say competitor. My god, he is such a good friend. He is a co-star, in fact, in a serial he would help me even with the dialogue delivery, adjust dates for my sake. He is still a close friend of mine.

Q. What is your impression of Prime Minister Narendra Modi?

A. He seriously wants to do good for the nation, he is trying hard and he is trying his best. That’s all I want to say for now.

Q. MGR was a hero in most of his films and was careful about his screen image. But you have acted as a villain, even drinking and smoking in many of your movies. Will that have an impact on your image as a public persona now that you have announced joining politics?

A. My films are different and my life entirely different. Why should you merge the two? I am paid as an actor for films, whether I like the role or not. If I enter politics, I will be myself. I want to make a difference in politics. Otherwise, why should Rajinikanth join politics? I want to introduce a new and different type of politics. Otherwise, I am 67, my health too is in a check-up stage (chuckles). It is not easy to enter politics at this age, it is not a path of flowers. But still you have to change things, change that will make a difference in politics.

Q. Going by your experience, how is politics different from films?

A. I have not become a full politician as yet. With my little experience of it, I can say, my god, it is tough, really tough. I told you everything is a game, drama. In cinema, everybody is there, the producer, the director, the writer…someone else does the script. Whereas in politics, as a leader, I am the director, the writer, everything… It is very challenging.

Q. In films, your acting is all about being superfast. Yet in politics you are cautious and are not rushing things or speaking about your plans.

A. Politics is a very big game and very dangerous too. So I have to play it cautiously. And timing is very important.

Q. Why did you decide to join politics?

A. It is all god’s will. When I say god, it is an answer. Everything is in that.

Q. You talk a lot of about spiritualism, even when you said you were joining politics. What role does spiritualism play in your life?

A. My elder brother Satyanarayana is a very spiritual person. The Ramakrishna Mission ashram was near my house in Bangalore. When I was around 7 years old, he put me in the Ramakrishna ashram. So from childhood, I had the Vedas, the Upanishads, meditation with me. Later, there were many gurus and I made many trips to the Himalayas. It is a deep subject. Only someone who experiences it knows about it. It is difficult to convey in words. Mainly, you get peace. When your mind is peaceful, whatever you do, you do it well. That is most important.

[“source=indiatoday]

How Aussie jewellery entrepreneur Pinar Parry overcame horrific online abuse

Brisbane woman Pinar Parry was in a personal slump when she came up with the business idea that would turn her life around.

The mum was dealing with an ailing business and had put on weight due to stress several years ago.

“I went through a really hard time trying to grow my business and my whole life went to sh*t,” she told news.com.au.

“I wasn’t looking after myself, I put on weight, and I wasn’t living my best life.

“I started looking at what had gone wrong, and I was reading a lot of psychology books about how to find your passion and purpose. I learnt so many new ideas, and I thought it would be great to wear something to remind you to live your best life every day.”

And so the idea behind Delta and Co was born — a jewellery company which produces delicate bracelets engraved with straight-talking “truth bombs” and phrases designed to inspire the wearer.

It officially launched in January 2016 as a side hustle, while Mrs Parry was pregnant with her third child.

At that time, her husband Anthony was often away as a FIFO worker, and Mrs Parry struggled to juggle her hectic family life with her growing business.

Pinar Parry was targeted by online trolls after launching Delta and Co — but she ‘blasted back’. Picture: Instagram/@deltaandco

Pinar Parry was targeted by online trolls after launching Delta and Co — but she ‘blasted back’. Picture: Instagram/@deltaandcoSource:Instagram

For 12 months, Delta and Co products were sold at pop up stores and events but last November, Mrs Parry realised it was time to go “all in” and focus solely on the business.

Her husband quit his FIFO job and joined the company full-time, and they soon “started to find their stride” through Facebook ads.

But then the abuse began.

“I started running Facebook ads as a way of marketing and I noticed some comments on the ads saying I’d copied the quotes from another business,” the 39-year-old said.

“They started popping up every day and at the beginning I addressed them nicely and diplomatically, and then I started deleting them.

“But eventually I decided to address them full-on.”

In a post which soon went viral, Mrs Parry explained the business was “100 per cent original” and that its branding and quotes had been inspired by her own experiences.

“ … if you are going to let yourself be bullied by random people on the internet you won’t survive in business, or in life for very long,” Mrs Parry wrote in her viral post.

Mrs Parry eventually decided to ‘blast back’. Picture: Facebook

Mrs Parry eventually decided to ‘blast back’. Picture: FacebookSource:Facebook

“If you let yourself get pushed around and listen to every a**hole with a two-bit opinion about what you SHOULD or SHOULDN’T be doing, you are simply NOT going to make it.

“It’s your life and you need to defend your right to exist, to shine, to grow, fiercely. And no one is going to step in and do that for you, but you.”

The post soon attracted thousands of likes, comments and shares, with many Facebook users praising Mrs Parry for fighting back against trolls.

Mrs Parry posted her October sales figures on the Facebook group Like Minded B**ches Drinking Wine. Picture: Facebook

Mrs Parry posted her October sales figures on the Facebook group Like Minded B**ches Drinking Wine. Picture: FacebookSource:Facebook

“The story about haters trying to hurt my business resonated with people,” she said, noting the post had led to a big spike in sales.

“The haters f***ed up — it ended up turning things from lemons to lemonade because I spun it around and sold so many (bracelets) just by telling my authentic story.

“Being authentic about who you are really resonates, rather than just saying ‘buy my sh*t’ — that doesn’t work.”

[“source=cnbc”]

Fashion for a cause

Image result for Fashion for a cause

Maija Onzule models at the Fashion for a Cure event in Queenstown on Thursday night.

The fourth annual Queenstown Fashion for a Cure event was held at The Grille.

Hundreds of people packed in to the venue see the fashions.

The event supports Breast Cancer Cure, a charity that fundraises for research to find a cure for breast cancer.

Fashion for a Cure started in Auckland and has spread around the country.

Breast Cancer Cure general manager Phillipa Green said last year’s show in Queenstown raised a record $90,000.

This year’s event, hosted by Shane Cortese, featured fashion from top designers Trelise Cooper, Storm, RUBY, Zambesi and Kathryn Wilson Footwear.

[“source=forbes]

In conversation with jewellery designer, Archana Behede

by Radhika Sathe Patwardhan | November 30, 2018, 12:00 AM IST

Archana Behede

Getting the most exclusive jewellery for D-Day is every bride’s dream and brand Gautam Banerjee does just that. We have a tête-à-tête with designer Archana Behede where she talks about her journey, the design process and the brand’s collections.

“I did not know much about jewellery,” says Behede, “I was only a buyer.” But it was when she started learning jewellery design that she had found her calling. “I never knew my potential till then. I used to design for a few jewellery houses and seeing the good response my designs got, I decided to start this brand. I trained under designer Gautam Banerjee – whose name is given to the brand. I learnt everything (about jewellery design) from him.”

Archana Behede

Designer jewellery is considered very expensive by most, and it is something that one gets only for occasions – how much ever one may like it. “We wanted to clear this myth when we started this brand. We wanted every woman to wear a nice (jewellery) piece. When one spends one’s hard-earned money, they have the right to get one of the best pieces. As a designer, I always make something which fits the pocket of everyone. I want every woman to relish the jewellery she buys from us. We give good designs at good rates also. We don’t target to make only expensive jewellery; we are very flexible. We make jewellery so that a woman can keep it lifelong.”

Archana Behede

The brand has all the types of jewellery – cocktail jewellery, wedding jewellery or simple daily wear jewellery but “while designing we make sure that every design is really unique. We have simple designs because few people want really simple thing and therefore we have something for them too. But despite being simple, it is also unique in its own way,” Behede elaborates, “When it comes to the techniques we use in manufacturing, the quality of polish and the setting of the diamond, we always take lots of care and pain to see that there is no fault in them when they come to the store as well. After a jewellery piece is made – be it earrings, neckpiece or rings, I personally check it if it is done right, and there isn’t any problem with it like if it is uncomfortable to wear, any joints are stiff, etc. We have a very strict quality check.”

Archana Behede

The inspiration for design, Behede claims, comes from anything and everything. “Sometimes, even an ensemble or a motif on the dress inspires me to a particular jewellery piece. The inspiration can sometimes be something vague; sometimes it is just whatever catches my attention or my eye. For example, once I was travelling to Mumbai and was looking outside the window, and I saw multi-storeyed buildings. So I thought I should do something in multi-layered jewellery. So I designed a bangle which was multi-layered which had three layers. Anything can inspire me when it comes to work.

[“source=gsmarena”]

The Australian Jewellery Brand You Should Have On Your Radar This Summer

Classic and yet of-the-moment, The Silver Collective is the Australian jewellery brand you should get to know, stat. Lending summer wardrobes a hit of shine, the brand’s collection of super-cool—and surprisingly affordable—minimalist pieces will elevate both your off-duty looks (think denim cut-offs and linen button-up blouses) and after-hours style.

Headed by mother-and-daughter duo Maria and Anastasia Papazoglou, the brand specialises in versatile Sterling Silver jewellery that transcends seasons. A mix of classic elegance and contemporary flourishes, the designs balance timeless style with modern detailing—think of them as heirlooms you’ll want to wear now.

Launching from home under the brand name ICONIC-STYLE in 2015, the label has since been rebranded as The Silver Collective. After two years of online business, the start-up now operates both online and from their year-old Sydney boutique.

The Silver Collective’s wide-ranging jewellery collection includes ultra-fine necklaces and chokers (perfect for layering under beach coverups or metallic party dresses), sculptural earrings and stackable rings. Despite the brand’s love of clean lines and a pared-back aesthetic, each season is crafted with unique personality. One of the brand’s best-sellers—and one of our top picks—the Pella necklace is made from an ancient gold-plated coin. Distinct in shape, it’ll add an insouciant edge to any summer look.

[“source=forbes]

Spike in diamond jewellery demand on Diwali

Diamond-1---BCCL
Aditya Pethe, director, WHP Jewellers said that they were expecting a 10% to 20% growth in footfall and since the day had started and it seems like we have met our expectations.
DiamondNSE 0.00 % jewellery is witnessing good demand in the Dhanteras-Diwali season, according to jewellers and trade officials. Lightweight gold jewellery too has emerged as the preferred choice for the consumers this festive season.

Atul Sinha, SVP – Marketing, CaratLane said “We are witnessing a shift in trend among jewellery buyers. The impact of higher gold prices is not so much on jewellery that can be worn on a daily basis. There is a double-digit growth in demand for jewellery that women can actually wear every day rather than heavy jewellery or gold coins which typically end up in the locker. We are expecting an increase in footfalls and a further surge in online purchases in the next two days.”

Added Vijay Jain CEO, ORRA “Both the run up to Dhanteras and Dhanteras has been positive. While gold has seen a positive trend over last year platinum and diamond jewellery growth rates have been in excess of 30 percent.”

Aditya Pethe, director, WHP Jewellers said that they were expecting a 10% to 20% growth in footfall and since the day had started and it seems like we have met our expectations.

“People are opting for light weight jewellery in gold and diamond. Traditional Maharashtrian designs like Naths, Mohan Maal etc are preferred by traditional customers. We have also seen younger generation visiting the store. One more thing we noticed this year is that customers are not restricting themselves to dhanteras for gold shopping. When we look at the year on year sales, we are meeting the expected sales targets.” he said.

Pankaj Khanna, MD, Khanna Gems said “We are expecting a considerable growth of 15-20% in the diamond jewellery consumption this year, as an impact of the extensive marketing campaigns of diamond jewellery by the brands. On the other hand, the demand for gemstones & gemstone Jewellery will increase by 10-15% this year due to the increasing disposable income of Indians during festivals like Diwali & Dhanteras.

[“source=forbes]